Rainbow felt puzzles

Rainbows are such a wonderful way to review and explore color and color mixing. As part of our exploration of rainbows, we invited the children to put together these simple felt rainbow puzzles.

Felt Rainbow Puzzles by Teach Preschool

We often sit down as a large group to explore different kinds of concepts through a hands-on activity. For the rainbow felt puzzles, each child was given their own small DIY felt board and felt puzzle set.

Felt Rainbow Puzzles by Teach Preschool

Miss Abby used the large group time to promote discussion with the children about size, shape, color, and rainbows.

Felt Rainbow Puzzles by Teach Preschool

Even though the children worked side-by-side on their rainbow puzzles, they still were given lots of room to put their puzzles together in their own way.

Felt Rainbow Puzzles by Teach Preschool

I always enjoy sitting down together as a large group to do a process such as this. It gives us time together to promote discussion, build community, and learn from each other.

Felt Rainbow Puzzles by Teach Preschool

Oh, and in case you were wondering, the felt we are using and that I love the most is a stiff felt. It cuts easily and holds it shape much better than soft (flimsy) felt.

Felt Rainbow Puzzles by Teach Preschool

Available on Amazon

Links to Grow On

The Rainbow Center by Teach Preschool

Amazing Rainbow Sensory and Discovery Bottles from Preschool Inspirations

By |2016-03-15T06:00:11+00:00March 15th, 2016|

About the Author:

Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. has been working and teaching in the field of early childhood education for over 30 years. Deborah currently owns and teaches in her own part-time, private preschool called The Children’s Studio. Deborah’s deep passion for teaching and working with young children is documented and then graciously shared with millions of readers around the world through her blog and other social networking communities. Deborah believes that young children learn best through play and exploration and embraces this belief in all that she does in her own classroom so that she can effectively and passionately share rewarding, real- life, tried-and-true practices with other teachers, parents, and leaders across the field of early childhood education.

7 Comments

  1. Cheryl March 15, 2016 at 8:59 am - Reply

    May I ask why you are using pink and what looks like black in your rainbows?

    • Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. March 16, 2016 at 8:23 pm - Reply

      Ah, the black is actually a dark purple and what we had on hand. The pink is because it was one of the colors we have been reviewing recently. For us, the focus was more on a color review and not on teaching the rainbow in what is considered by the majority to be “correct”. Which, by the way, if one really researches, one will discover there are LOTS of colors in the rainbow, “So going off of unique frequencies, there are more colors in a rainbow than there are stars in the Universe or atoms in your body, but that goes far beyond what we can perceive. Your imperfect eye can (probably) only discern about a million distinct colors when you view a rainbow, or anything else, for that matter.” from https://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/08/14/how-many-colors-are-really-in-a-rainbow/

  2. Mary Landrum March 15, 2016 at 10:05 am - Reply

    I’m doing a preschool program about rainbows at my public library next week. This was perfect timing. Thank you!

  3. Ms. Mary March 15, 2016 at 2:56 pm - Reply

    I was wondering the same thing about the pink, but maybe the black looking piece is really indigo. So many people leave indigo out of the rainbow. When I teach my preschooler’s the colors in the rainbow, I tell them, it isn’t a true rainbow without indigo????

    • Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed. March 16, 2016 at 8:25 pm - Reply

      Yes, the black is actually a dark purple:) The pink, because we like pink! But I often share this article when we get on the topic of rainbows that you might like – “So going off of unique frequencies, there are more colors in a rainbow than there are stars in the Universe or atoms in your body, but that goes far beyond what we can perceive. Your imperfect eye can (probably) only discern about a million distinct colors when you view a rainbow, or anything else, for that matter.” from https://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2012/08/14/how-many-colors-are-really-in-a-rainbow/

  4. Jeanette March 15, 2016 at 5:18 pm - Reply

    Please tell me about the mats the children are working on. What a great size for independent learning!
    Love the stiff felt too!

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