The number one way to get students to listen to you.

by Deborah Stewart, M.Ed.

​As I stood and watched the boys play in the block center, I could see that things were heading in the wrong direction and it wouldn’t be much longer before someone was going to either get hurt or upset.

I had already talked to the kids about being kind and careful in their play but there were two little ones who were headed towards trouble in a hurry.

Was it that they hadn’t absorbed my message or that they just didn’t care? These two children were bright and capable so I had no doubt they had absorbed my message but I didn’t want to assume that they just didn’t care.

I remembered having said hello when they came to school first thing each morning but other than that, I hadn’t spoken to either one except to remind them to be kind and to make good choices.

And then I started to wonder. How many times had I spoken to either of the two children that day or even that week? I remembered having said hello when they came to school first thing each morning but other than that, I hadn’t spoken to either one except to remind them to be kind and to make good choices.

Oh sure, I had read a story, sang some songs, and gave a variety of instructions but that was to the whole group.

The reality was, I wasn’t working on building my relationship with each of the two children on an individual basis.

In fact, I rarely spoke to either child on a one-to-one basis. I had the two children tied together as one in my communication. It was me talking to them which meant what I had to say on anything would have less meaning than what they had to say to each other.

You see, in order for the children to want to listen to me, I must begin with building my relationship with each child in the classroom.

You see, in order for the children to want to listen to me, I must begin with building my relationship with each child in the classroom. It is through relationships that we start to care about what each other thinks, how each other feels, and what each other has to say.

If I want any of my students to listen to me, I have to start with building a connection between myself and each child. One little connection here and there adds up to a relationship.

There are so many ways to solve a problem in the classroom but the best place to start is by looking within you.

Meaningful relationships with your students begins with you and the choices you make. This is just the beginning of how you (and I) find the solutions within us.

I asked some of the Members from the Honey Bee Hive to share what “The solution to every classroom challenge is within you” means to them. I thought you might like to hear a few of their responses.

  • Darla
  • Kathy
  • Valerie

Darla: Early childhood teacher and member of the Honey Bee Hive

You have more power than you know to make a positive difference in your classroom and in your own teaching practice. Real, practical, and doable solutions really are within you and I can’t wait to tell you more.

The Solution Within You!

I'm presenting an informative  and FREE presentation on finding the solutions within you. This is a 3-part series where I will break down some common problems in the classroom and show you how to find the solutions that create engagement and confidence in your children. Click the button below to visit the presentation page.

Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed.

Deborah Stewart, M.Ed.

Deborah J. Stewart, M.Ed.

Deborah Stewart, M.Ed.

The Solution Within You!

I'm presenting an informative  and FREE presentation on finding the solutions within you. This is a 3-part series where I will break down some common problems in the classroom and show you how to find the solutions that create engagement and confidence in your children. Click the button below to visit the presentation page.